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National Weather Service Says There Were Actually Three Tornadoes in Greater Cincinnati Last Week | Cincinnati News | Cincinnati

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Photo: National Weather Service in Wilmington

The tornado ripped a destructive 4.5-mile path in and near Goshen on July 6, 2022.

Locals are still dealing with the aftermath of the tornado that ripped through Goshen Township on July 6, but many people in Greater Cincinnati may not realize that there actually were three tornadoes that day.

The National Weather Service in Wilmington has updated its investigation of last week’s storms and related incidents, including the Goshen tornado.

“Early in the morning on July 6th, a band of training storms moved from northeast Indiana southeast through west-central Ohio and central Ohio, producing a swath of 2-6″ of rain near this corridor,” the agency says. “By the afternoon, a large complex of storms track east from central Indiana through east-central Indiana and the Tri-State area, producing large swaths of significant straight-line wind damage and a few tornadoes.”

Previously, the NWS classified the Goshen tornado as an EF2, with winds of 111-135 MPH. Goshen Township Administrator Steve Pegram declared a state of emergency Wednesday, when about 200 buildings had been classified as damaged or demolished at that point, including the fire and police departments. The tornado ripped roofs from a number of structures, and lightning and falling trees caused even more damage to buildings and roads, Pegram said. He added that three people were injured.

The NWS said last week that the tornado began in Pleasant Plain in Clermont County and gathered strength as it moved southwest to Goshen, where it measured 750 yards wide and had winds of 130 MPH at its peak. The tornado then continued southeast to Newtonsville, where it eventually petered out. The destructive event ran from 3:06 p.m.-3:14 p.m. and ran for about 4.5 miles, the NWS said.

From the NWS report:

AS THE TORNADO APPROACHED GOSHEN IT RAPIDLY STRENGTHENED AND GREW
TO AROUND 750 YARDS IN WIDTH. THE TORNADO CROSSED MAIN STREET
JUST TO THE WEST OF HIGHWAY 28 CAUSING SIGNIFICANT DAMAGE TO A
COUPLE OF BUSINESSES. AN INSURANCE AGENCY COMPLETELY LOST ITS ROOF
AND SEVERAL OF THE EXTERIOR WALLS COLLAPSED. A WOMAN INSIDE THE
BUSINESS WAS TRANSPORTED TO THE HOSPITAL WITH NON-LIFE THREATENING
INJURIES.THE LARGE AND STRONG TORNADO THEN CROSSED HIGHWAY 28
SIGNIFICANTLY DAMAGING A FIRE STATION AND CAUSING COMPLETE ROOF
LOSS TO A BRICK BUSINESS NEXT DOOR. MOST OF THE EXTERIOR WALLS ON
THE BUSINESS ALSO COLLAPSED. A FIREFIGHTER AT THE FIRE STATION
ALSO SUFFERED MINOR INJURIES. THIS WAS THE STRONGEST POINT IN THE
TORNADO LIFE CYCLE WITH WINDS ESTIMATED AROUND 130 MPH.

The NWS now also has issued reports on tornadoes near Loveland in Clermont County and Lake Lorelei in Brown County. The agency says that the Loveland tornado was an EF1, with winds of 86-110 MPH. It began at 2:57 p.m. July 6, ran for .75 miles and was 100 yards wide at its peak. The tornado caused roof and fence damage, loosened house siding and uprooted trees, the NWS says.

The tornado in Lake Lorelei also was an EF1, the NWS reports. It reached 250 yards wide and traveled 3.4 miles between 3:17 p.m. and 3:21 p.m. Lake Lorelei and Brown County in general saw significant tree damage, plus the tornado there lifted porches from homes.

Officials in Clermont County, where the Goshen tornado did extensive damage, says that all roads have been cleared of debris and are open to traffic, but congestion continues to be a problem for recovery efforts.

Many Duke Energy customers throughout the tri-state lost power last week, including more than 100,000 on July 6. Duke currently shows that just a few dozen residents remain without electricity.

Clermont County’s emergency management team says it’s transitioning to a “community-driven recovery” now, with local organizations and volunteer groups providing assistance. Residents can call 513-735-8500 for help. There also is a relief fund in place.

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