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Sorry, but Ohio Residents Don’t Want to Buy Your Former Meth House, in 2021 Cincinnati News About Housing

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Like other states, Ohio has seen a housing surge lately that has pushed both single-family home prices and monthly apartment rates higher and higher.

But even in this market, Ohioans apparently don’t want former methamphetamine dens.

A recent survey from Rehabs.com, a directory of addiction centers across the United States, suggests that many homebuyers are apprehensive to take over a house that used to see some Walter White action happening inside. Ohioans might consider such a home, but only if they could get it at a 41% discount, a figure that Rehabs says amounts to more than $63,000.

And half of all respondents wouldn’t even bother. They tell Rehabs that they’d pull out of a deal if they learned that the house had been a haven for drugs. 

What’s everyone so worried about? Stigma, it seems. In an email, Rehabs says that more than a fourth of respondents fear what friends and family would think if they bought a former drug-ridden property. 

Homebuyers also are concerned with a house’s cleanliness. Nearly 60% say they’d need to conduct a thorough cleaning upon taking over the house, Rehabs reports.

Moreover, people are wary to purchase homes in neighborhoods where drug houses still may be operating. A third of respondents say they would be nervous about nearby in-home meth labs, and 67% say they would not visit friends or family in such a neighborhood.

For its data, Rehabs conducted its survey among 3,300 property buyers in Ohio.

Relatedly, Rehabs recently analyzed meth lab busts and drug trends to map areas of concern. Ohio is not among the top states for meth labs, but Indiana, just a short drive away, is No. 5 on the Rehabs map. See all of Rehabs’ data.

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